I Am No One by Patrick Flanery

Image result for i am no one bookI Am No One

Author: Patrick Flanery
Genre: Fiction, Mystery
Format: Paperback
Publisher: Tim Duggan Books
Release Date: April 4, 2017
Pages: 352

Author Website|Book Depository|Goodreads

Goodreads Synopsis: After a decade living in England, Jeremy O’Keefe returns to New York, where he has been hired as a professor of German history at New York University. Though comfortable in his new life, and happy to be near his daughter once again, Jeremy continues to feel the quiet pangs of loneliness. Walking through the city at night, it’s as though he could disappear and no one would even notice.

But soon, Jeremy’s life begins taking strange turns: boxes containing records of his online activity are delivered to his apartment, a young man seems to be following him, and his elderly mother receives anonymous phone calls slandering her son. Why, he wonders, would anyone want to watch him so closely, and, even more upsetting, why would they alert him to the fact that he was being watched?

As Jeremy takes stock of the entanglements that marked his years abroad, he wonders if he has unwittingly committed a crime so serious as to make him an enemy of the state. Moving towards a shattering reassessment of what it means to be free in a time of ever more intrusive surveillance, Jeremy is forced to ask himself whether he is “no one,” as he believes, or a traitor not just to his country but to everyone around him.

Jen’s Rating: 🌟🌟

REVIEW: I Am No One wasn’t a read that I could really get into. It took me a good while to delve into its pages and even then it didn’t quite have enough of the mystery and suspense I was hoping for.

Much of this novel’s first chapter was about Jeremy’s return to New York and his career, where its taken him, and where it has gotten him. That is more than fine, a backstory is always nice, but when reading a first page I want something that catches my attention right from the beginning. It wasn’t until I moved along the novel a little further, that I started to become a bit more attentive with the read.

“I walked home and was going to email her to ask why she hadn’t shown up, only to discover that I appear to have written to her earlier today to ask if I could reschedule and she responded saying that was fine. Now the problem is, I have no memory of writing that email asking to reschedule, nor do I remember reading her reply, and yet both messages are there.”

As I kept reading I could feel Jeremy’s paranoia as things didn’t seem to make sense and weird encounters became more common then they should have been. When I felt like I wouldn’t be able to keep reading on with I Am No One, there came a few thrilling parts and mystique that I was hoping would be carried within most of these pages. From meeting figures in the street that all of a sudden seemed to be outside his window, to the uneasiness of being in his own place and feeling the need to double check every accessibility into it.

Then to make matters worse, with his ever growing paranoia, he meets a Michael Ramsey that may or may not be whom he says he is and may or may not be staying in Jeremy’s neighbors’ house for the meantime. Jeremy’s mind goes into overdrive, fueling the craziness that he believes to be following him from his time in Oxford. With all of this and the more it continues into the second half of the novel, I couldn’t help but finish this read.

There were many parts that I felt were more detailed than needed be, some areas I wished had more of it. Although the first half of this novel had been like this, the second half was a little better, but I still couldn’t find a footing with it. I kept skimming through several sections and only really reading through a portion of this book. It just wasn’t a novel for me, no matter how much I wanted to like it, and even with the sections that caught my attention, it just wasn’t enough.

***I received this copy from Crown/Penguin Random in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.***

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